Author Topic: Reconstructive Ear Otoplasty Forum - Building Ears With 3D Printing Progress  (Read 9165 times)

Offline DrBermant

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This should not be construed as medical advice. I am a retired Board Certified Plastic Surgeon.

I have been dreaming of such reconstructive options for decades. Finally saw something that is the closest yet to my fantasies. 3D printers using living tissues for their inks.



3D printer and living "ink" create cartilage

is a description of making cartilage shaped for implantation. This is a nice ideal framework that hopefully will present with warp less options that plague rib graft methods. My career is over, but the sad part is that this may be more than 20 years away from real use. These are much more viable options than silicone implants, but have much testing before practical. Not even discussed would be more complex blood supply connected framework of cartilage and skin. Now we are talking about the real ear fabrication and possibly an essential step before we obtain an ear that maintains it shape and is as delicate and natural as the normal human ear.

'Printing' human organs with 3D bio-printer

Quote
US researchers at Cornell University have engineered an ear made of silicone using a 3D printer, which they hope will one day be capable of producing functional human body parts.
uses silicone for their printing. The problem here is that silicone implants tend to erode through the skin and tend to need thick flap based tissue coverings that hide delicate structures. Like many ear reconstructions, they may be miracles in concept and execution, but until you see what they look like on live patients, do not hold your breath. That is the issue with much ear reconstruction. Try to find examples from that method that look great. If you have such examples, post them here or add links to resources with such work. The proof is in good Standard Ear Picture Documentation.

If we are going to fantasize again with no limits, let us have the 3D printers give us a cartilage framework that does not warp integrated with a blood supply one or 2 arteries and veins to hook up to the patient, and even further, a nerve supply that also can be attached, and this covered by a natural thin skin layer that can be matched to the color of the patient. Oh well, back to my working Harry Potter Magic Wand
request...

Hope this helps,

Michael Bermant, MD
Learn More About Otoplasty Ear Surgery
Michael Bermant, MD
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Offline DrBermant

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This should not be construed as medical advice. I am a retired Board Certified Plastic Surgeon.

I have been dreaming of such reconstructive options for decades. Finally saw something that is the closest yet to my fantasies. 3D printers using living tissues for their inks.



3D printer and living "ink" create cartilage

is a description of making cartilage shaped for implantation. This is a nice ideal framework that hopefully will present with warp less options that plague rib graft methods. My career is over, but the sad part is that this may be more than 20 years away from real use. These are much more viable options than silicone implants, but have much testing before practical. Not even discussed would be more complex blood supply connected framework of cartilage and skin. Now we are talking about the real ear fabrication and possibly an essential step before we obtain an ear that maintains it shape and is as delicate and natural as the normal human ear.

'Printing' human organs with 3D bio-printer

Quote
US researchers at Cornell University have engineered an ear made of silicone using a 3D printer, which they hope will one day be capable of producing functional human body parts.
uses silicone for their printing. The problem here is that silicone implants tend to erode through the skin and tend to need thick flap based tissue coverings that hide delicate structures. Like many ear reconstructions, they may be miracles in concept and execution, but until you see what they look like on live patients, do not hold your breath. That is the issue with much ear reconstruction. Try to find examples from that method that look great. If you have such examples, post them here or add links to resources with such work. The proof is in good Standard Ear Picture Documentation.

If we are going to fantasize again with no limits, let us have the 3D printers give us a cartilage framework that does not warp integrated with a blood supply one or 2 arteries and veins to hook up to the patient, and even further, a nerve supply that also can be attached, and this covered by a natural thin skin layer that can be matched to the color of the patient. Oh well, back to my working Harry Potter Magic Wand
request...

Hope this helps,

Michael Bermant, MD
Learn More About Otoplasty Ear Surgery

This should not be construed as medical advice. I am a retired Board Certified Plastic Surgeon.

Artificial blood vessels created on a 3D printer is the next needed component for the living tissue ear. This would make the process multiphasic. Build the frame, then the vessels, and then the skin.

My read would be that the vessel printing would be for larger scale vessels and then using some angiogenesis blood vessel making bath to stimulate these vessels to make the smaller structures into the rest of the tissue. After the framework was made, the vessel layers would be applied and then the finer structures added. Then the skin would be layered on next. One option may be at this point to use skin grafts if there is actually a decent bed. Living skin cells or stem cells in a bath could be triggered to be either the small blood vessel event or the dermal or outer skin layers.



Large vessel technology may be great for some things, but for the ear vessels start in the 1.5mm or less range and go down from there.

3D Printing Used to Make Artificial Blood Vessels

3D printing blood vessels with great inspirational video.

Here is another video on Organ Printing .

Regenerative Medicine: Current Concepts and Changing Trends Lecture of state of the art as of Air date: Wednesday, January 25, 2012.

Biomaterials for Tissue Engineering over hour long lecture Air date: Wednesday, September 28, 2011.

Join in the discussion and voice your opinions.

Hope this helps,

Michael Bermant, MD
Learn More About Otoplasty Ear Surgery
Michael Bermant, MD
Retired Plastic Surgeon
Surgical Sculptor, Artist, Creative Thinker, Problem Solver
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Offline DrBermant

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This should not be construed as medical advice. I am a retired Board Certified Plastic Surgeon.

Here is new nano 3d printing demonstration.

3D-nanoprinting speed record set by Vienna University



Quote
Prof Stampfl said his team's technique can work in water-based environments meaning it is also capable of creating scaffolds suitable for softer tissues such as cartilage and muscle tissue.

"We can also 'write' these structures in the presence of cells as we use an infrared laser which is completely harmless for biological tissue," he added.

"This is not possible with other 3D-printing techniques which first rely on making the scaffolds and then seed the cells, or use a thin inkjet nozzle to push through the cells which may damage them.

Such issues are critical in tissue fabrication. The small size also opens up the small ear bone structures. 3D printing with a modified structure permitting articulation/ transmission of sound could open up middle ear reconstruction theoretically. But you still need to anchor the 2 ends and work on sound transmission and how durable that material is. Feats that would take some time to prove.

Making cars and buildings in miniature are cute but demonstrating living tissue examples that have been tested over time is, in my opinion still only a dream.

Hope this helps,

Michael Bermant, MD
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Michael Bermant, MD
Retired Plastic Surgeon
Surgical Sculptor, Artist, Creative Thinker, Problem Solver
Plastic Surgery
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