Author Topic: Plastic Surgery Forum - Writer Hopes to find Someone That Could Answer Questions  (Read 7039 times)

Offline DrBermant

  • Plastic Surgeon - Site Owner
  • Administrator
  • Mentor Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 1166
    • View Profile
    • Bermant Plastic Surgery
Quote
I'm a writer working on a piece of fiction that involves plastic surgery and I was hoping to find someone whom I could ask a few questions.

Our forum is one such place where such questions can be answered. You can then use our social media tools to attract other surgeons to work with. If it deals with a specific topic, then feel free to post in that section.

Hope this helps,

Michael Bermant, MD
Retired Plastic Surgeon
Learn More About Plastic Surgery
Michael Bermant, MD
Retired Plastic Surgeon
Surgical Sculptor, Artist, Creative Thinker, Problem Solver
Plastic Surgery
Follow DrBermant on Twitter
Like us on Facebook:
Encyclopedia News
Forum Updates

Offline garrisrd

  • New Member
  • *
  • Posts: 2
    • View Profile
Thank you Doctor.

I have a question that deals with the office a surgeon works in. Is it closed during the weekend? Or is it typically staffed 24/7 by nurses and the like. When someone has to have a lot of work done (ie face lift, rhinoplasty, liposuction, etc) do they typically recover in the facility?

Please pardon if I am posting in the wrong thread...

Offline DrBermant

  • Plastic Surgeon - Site Owner
  • Administrator
  • Mentor Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 1166
    • View Profile
    • Bermant Plastic Surgery
Thank you Doctor.

I have a question that deals with the office a surgeon works in. Is it closed during the weekend? Or is it typically staffed 24/7 by nurses and the like. When someone has to have a lot of work done (ie face lift, rhinoplasty, liposuction, etc) do they typically recover in the facility?

Please pardon if I am posting in the wrong thread...

This should not be construed as medical advice. I am a retired Board Certified Plastic Surgeon.

Plastic Surgery Offices or places we work vary by quite a margin. My practice evolved away from trauma and emergencies as I attracted patients from around the world. It is not fair to someone traveling a great distance for a surgery planned well in advance to be told "sorry, the doctor was called to treat an emergency for a trauma victim in the emergency room." We saw many who had to budget for their sculpture and having to reschedule was not something we took lightly.

We often did schedule weekend elective surgery in the office to accommodate complex planning. Emergencies do need staff coverage 24/7, and better Operating Room Accreditation requires 24/7 access to nearby hospitals where the surgeon is on staff to manage problems. Some surgeons practice in hospitals with that 24/7 staff availability. Others use that arrangement for back up. Some doctors have their own staff available all the time for any problems. Although I always had that option, the goal was prevention. That is something I rarely needed for my patients. But it was always there.

Recovery after surgery depended on the operation and in my practice evolved over time. I was able to move the Recovery After Tummy Tuck stomach surgery from hospital with a night's stay, to hospital out patient, and then eventually to an office based operation with no stay. That was amazing. I was doing an incredible operation under local anesthesia - heavy sedation with Comfort After Tummy Tuck that patients were getting around comfortably on their own with little medication. Historically, this had been a painful operation with prolonged recovery and discomfort as taught by other surgeons' methods. I wanted a better way. Some surgeons still are using methods that do require patient stay in the hospital for safety and other factors.

My Rhinoplasty nasal surgery was always hospital based, but without hospital stay. Other surgeons offer office based rhinoplasty, some with in office recovery options. In office overnight recovery tends to be an expensive option for both surgeon and patients. When needed, I preferred setting that type of surgery up in the hosptial for my preferences.

Other operations require hospitalization for safety reasons. Florida found some surgeons did not have enough common sense and had to pass laws to protect the public from some bad doctors such as large volume liposuction, something I never thought was an acceptable operation. Liposuction can be a safe operation and I used it as a component of many sculptures, but never in that volume.

However, Not All Surgeons Have the Same Skills nor use the same techniques nor have the same office arrangements. That is why the question is difficult to answer. Is the surgeon a superstar, someone who is hospital based, or is there a line of malpractice lawyers lining up to deal with disasters of a bad doctor's methods and sanctions from licensing boards?  I did see some horror stories from bad doctor judgement as to method of recovery and where the surgery was done.

For my own practice I preferred to always schedule elective surgery when I personally would be available 24/7 for my patients especially during the critical recovery after surgery period. Yet you can search my responses in these and our static older forums from other surgeons' patients asking for my help because their doctors were not available?

I found one example here Revision Gynecomastia Experience Discussion on the reply to Unhappy After Gynecomastia Surgery.

So, you will need to be a little more specific in the question. It is too broad to answer as posted.

Hope this helps,

Michael Bermant, MD
Learn More About Plastic Surgery
Michael Bermant, MD
Retired Plastic Surgeon
Surgical Sculptor, Artist, Creative Thinker, Problem Solver
Plastic Surgery
Follow DrBermant on Twitter
Like us on Facebook:
Encyclopedia News
Forum Updates

Offline DrBermant

  • Plastic Surgeon - Site Owner
  • Administrator
  • Mentor Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 1166
    • View Profile
    • Bermant Plastic Surgery
Thank you Doctor.

I have a question that deals with the office a surgeon works in. Is it closed during the weekend? Or is it typically staffed 24/7 by nurses and the like. When someone has to have a lot of work done (ie face lift, rhinoplasty, liposuction, etc) do they typically recover in the facility?

Please pardon if I am posting in the wrong thread...

This should not be construed as medical advice. I am a retired Board Certified Plastic Surgeon.

I preferred patient comfort over combining multiple operations at the same time. For safety reasons due to limits of amounts of local anesthesia, I never combined Rhinoplasty with Facelift and other body Liposuction. Other doctors do combine, but do they show the path a patient takes to get to final recovery? My methods for comfort required concentrating on specific sculptures such as Gynecomastia Recovery for male chest breast reduction. Documenting the recovery path for a particular methodology can be a powerful tool in helping patients better understand what to expect after surgery and attracting patients from around the world.

Hope this helps,

Michael Bermant, MD
Learn More About Plastic Surgery
Michael Bermant, MD
Retired Plastic Surgeon
Surgical Sculptor, Artist, Creative Thinker, Problem Solver
Plastic Surgery
Follow DrBermant on Twitter
Like us on Facebook:
Encyclopedia News
Forum Updates

Offline garrisrd

  • New Member
  • *
  • Posts: 2
    • View Profile
For a small office, where do the prescription drugs for pain management such as oxycodone come from? Do most offices have their own pharmacies? Who manages ordering medication from the drug supplier? Does the drug supplier simply fill whatever the office requests, at whatever milligrams are requested? (For example, if an office ordered 300 mg of Oxcodone, would it be fulfilled, no questions asked?)

What is the most popular pain medication currently prescribed? At what typical dosage?

Thanks again for your help.

Offline DrBermant

  • Plastic Surgeon - Site Owner
  • Administrator
  • Mentor Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 1166
    • View Profile
    • Bermant Plastic Surgery
For a small office, where do the prescription drugs for pain management such as oxycodone come from? Do most offices have their own pharmacies? Who manages ordering medication from the drug supplier? Does the drug supplier simply fill whatever the office requests, at whatever milligrams are requested? (For example, if an office ordered 300 mg of Oxcodone, would it be fulfilled, no questions asked?)

What is the most popular pain medication currently prescribed? At what typical dosage?

Thanks again for your help.

This should not be construed as medical advice. I am a retired Board Certified Plastic Surgeon.

Each office has their own methods, but as part of an effective Accredited Operating Room, such issues are carefully regulated, monitored, and documented for use, methodology, and where they are stored.

I preferred evolving techniques that resulted in less discomfort. Each patient was given a Rx for Lortab and asked to bring both that and a bottle of plain Tylenol for use after surgery. Most of my patients found that the plain Tylenol was enough for their comfort. Here are some of the many examples of experiences on my site:

Comfort After Gynecomastia Surgery

Comfort After Tummy Tuck

Hope this helps,

Michael Bermant, MD
Learn More About Plastic Surgery
Michael Bermant, MD
Retired Plastic Surgeon
Surgical Sculptor, Artist, Creative Thinker, Problem Solver
Plastic Surgery
Follow DrBermant on Twitter
Like us on Facebook:
Encyclopedia News
Forum Updates