Author Topic: Questions I can't find answers to anywhere on the internet  (Read 4577 times)

Offline ratt57

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Questions I can't find answers to anywhere on the internet
« on: April 14, 2013, 10:33:17 PM »
I'm a 56 year-old male who had this procedure performed in Thailand approximately a month ago.  I originally thought it would be just be a liposuction procedure, but the doctor there explained that due to the amount of gynecomastia I had, it would result in too much excess tissue.  As a result, he performed a mastopexy.  I work out pretty regularly and normally have a pretty hairy chest and am awaiting the hair to grow back; the scars under each pec are a little alarming and I'm hoping the hair will partially conceal them.  I'm also wearing silicone scar patches across each scar (they're both approximately 8 inches long) pretty much 24/7 hoping they will help reduce them.

The procedure also involved in a free nipple graft, which I was a little concerned about.  Strangely enough, I am already experiencing sensation in both nipples, the left one more than the right, but can definitely feel any grazing of my fingertips, etc., which I find somewhat curious.

My questions are the following, and I've never seen these addressed anywhere: what is the name of the gland that is removed during gynecomastia surgery, and how essential is it hormonally?  Can removal of the gland cause any kind of imbalance in the body?  Five years ago I was diagnosed with neuroendocrine lung cancer, and have been informed this and recent weight loss is probably what contributed to the excess glandular tissue (the tumor was about the size of a grapefruit).  After being treated with radiation and chemotherapy, I've been in remission for almost five years now, and am hoping that removal of the gland will not be a potential problem. 

Would removal of this gland be the reason it seems to be taking the hair on my chest to grow back so slowly?  I don't remember it taking this long to grow back after I finished chemotherapy, but I could be wrong.  It's been a month and it's only about 25% of what it normally is.

Offline DrBermant

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Re: Questions I can't find answers to anywhere on the internet
« Reply #1 on: April 15, 2013, 05:22:56 AM »
I'm a 56 year-old male who had this procedure performed in Thailand approximately a month ago.  I originally thought it would be just be a liposuction procedure, but the doctor there explained that due to the amount of gynecomastia I had, it would result in too much excess tissue.  As a result, he performed a mastopexy.

This should not be construed as medical advice. I am a retired Board Certified Plastic Surgeon.

Welcome to our forum.

Was this decision to change from liposuction to Male Mastopexy done during surgery or as part of the plan before the operation? When I was in practice for my patients, the operations are so different, that I had different consents, and discussions of risks benefits and alternate methods of care. I based the decision to lift the male chest on Excess Skin of the Male Chest, not on the amount of breast tissue. With my techniques and normal skin elasticity, I was able to avoid the extended scars for my patients. Why not post a complete set of my Standard Loose Skin Male Chest Pictures to show the original problem (or what ever photos the doctor took to document the before problem. At least the after surgery current problem should be the complete set.

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I work out pretty regularly and normally have a pretty hairy chest and am awaiting the hair to grow back; the scars under each pec are a little alarming and I'm hoping the hair will partially conceal them.  I'm also wearing silicone scar patches across each scar (they're both approximately 8 inches long) pretty much 24/7 hoping they will help reduce them.

Hair regrowth depends on damage to the hair growing cells, blood supply, nutrition, hormones, and many other factors. Radiation therapy, chemotherapy, trauma to tissue, trauma to the hair follicles themselves all can influence the growth.

Scar Care can be critical after surgery. For my patients I used several different modes, both topical and compression. Each of my patients was fitted before surgery with After Surgery Compression Vests. The Second Stage Compression Vest became mandatory as I found the scars were so much better for my patients using this compression.

8 inch long scars? Just how much weight loss or excess skin was there before surgery requiring free nipple grafting and a Skin Reduction Chest Lift. I preferred to avoid longer scars and evolved my  Internal Lift Male Mastopexy specifically for those who had skin that could accommodate the change. But each of my skin reduction patients started out with Low Nipples and loose skin for me to address a chest with a skin reduction scar.

Quote
The procedure also involved in a free nipple graft, which I was a little concerned about.  Strangely enough, I am already experiencing sensation in both nipples, the left one more than the right, but can definitely feel any grazing of my fingertips, etc., which I find somewhat curious.

Free nipple grafts means the tissue is completely removed and reattached. Nerve fibers providing sensation need to regrow into the tissue. This can take some time for the skin itself. Sometimes some sensation can be felt from remaining nerves under the grafts. Otherwise nerves grow in from the sides and it can take months or longer.

Quote
My questions are the following, and I've never seen these addressed anywhere: what is the name of the gland that is removed during gynecomastia surgery, and how essential is it hormonally?  Can removal of the gland cause any kind of imbalance in the body?  Five years ago I was diagnosed with neuroendocrine lung cancer, and have been informed this and recent weight loss is probably what contributed to the excess glandular tissue (the tumor was about the size of a grapefruit).  After being treated with radiation and chemotherapy, I've been in remission for almost five years now, and am hoping that removal of the gland will not be a potential problem. 

Would removal of this gland be the reason it seems to be taking the hair on my chest to grow back so slowly?  I don't remember it taking this long to grow back after I finished chemotherapy, but I could be wrong.  It's been a month and it's only about 25% of what it normally is.

Gland removed during male breast reduction is typically breast tissue. This structure is designed to make milk under the right hormonal controls. It is a mammal structure and present in both males and females. Gynecomastia Gland Gallery shows gland I removed during my surgery. There is a male mastopexy section where the additional structures besides the gland are demonstrated. I know of no hair growing function of mammal breast glandular tissues.

Hope this helps,

Michael Bermant, MD
Retired Plastic Surgeon
Learn More About Gynecomastia of Male Chest Ptosis - Sagging and Male Mastopexy Chest Lift Sculpture
Michael Bermant, MD
Retired Plastic Surgeon
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